World Cinema: Table of Contents

 

Contents

Click bolded chapter titles for summaries

Introduction  1

  • The contemporary moment  4
  • Polycentric world cinema  6
  • Polymorphic world cinema  9
  • Polyvalent world cinema  10
  • Teaching world cinema  11

 

Chapter 1: What is world cinema?  15

  • The antecedents: world literature  15
  • International foreign, global, or world cinema  18
  • Hollywood is not world cinema  21
  • Polycentric, polymorphic, and polyvalent world cinema  23
    • Polycentric world cinema  25
    • Polymorphic world cinema  27
    • Polyvalent world cinema  28
  • What world cinema is: from watching films to mapping cinema 30

 

Chapter 2: Watching world cinema  37

  • Watching films in theaters  38
  • The rise of the multiplex  41
  • Art house cinemas  44
  • Film societies, cine clubs, touring theaters  48
  • Mobile media: VHS, VCD, DVD  51
  • In focus 2.1: Piracy  53
  • Home viewing, streaming, video on demand, and mobile scenes  56
    • Home viewing  56
    • Netflix and the culture of streaming films  58
    • The long tail  59
    • YouTube  60
  • In focus 2.2: Translation, subtitles, dubbing  62
  • Digital projection in theaters  66

 

Chapter 3: Film Production and Finance  75

  • Hollywood’s interventions  77
  • European Production models 79
    • Forms of private funding  80
    • Public funding and state support  81
  • Asian production models 84
    • China  84
    • Hong Kong  87
    • Japan  89
    • South Korea  91
  • Indian production models  94
  • Nigerian cinema/Nollywood   97
  • Other models of production 99
    • Co-production funds 99
    • Film festivals’ production funds 100
    • Individual production of films 101

 

Chapter 4: Film festivals and world cinema  105

  • Film festivals and national cinema  107
  • Film festivals and art cinema  108
  • Film festivals and world cinema  109
    • Global networks  111
    • A festival film? Producing the genre of world cinema  113
  • In focus 4.1: Discovering Iranian cinema  117
  • In focus 4.2: The creation of the Romanian New Wave 120
  • Digital delivery and the creation of global film culture  123
  • The importance of smaller and regional film festivals: the Sarajevo Film        Festival  125

 

Chapter 5: Indian cinema and Bollywood  135

  • Bollywood: what is in a name?  135
  • Indian cinema’s spheres of influence  140
    • Influence of Indian cinema on non-Indian audiences  141
    • Indian cinema and the diaspora  144 
  • Indian cinema after Bollywoodization  148
    • From family dramas to blockbusters  148
    • Hindi mainstream cinema after Bollywood  151
  • In focus 5.1: Rajkumar Hirani and Ram Gopal Varma: mavericks transform the mainstream  153
    • Cinemas of multiple languages  156
  • In focus 5.2: Mani Ratnam: negotiating the local and the national  157
    • Other examples of language cinemas 159
    • The cinema of new social realism  160
  • In focus 5.3: New and bold currents in Indian cinema: Liar’s Dice (2014), Asha Jaoar Majhe/ Labor of Love (2014), and Qissa: The tale of a Lonely Ghost (2013)  163
  • Indian theoretical perspectives  167
    • Looking, frontality, and framing  168
    • Aesthetics of affect  170
    • Forms of narrative/storytelling  172

 

Chapter 6: African cinema and Nollywood  175

  • Nollywood: what is in a name?  176
    • African cinema and Nollywood  177
  • Understanding Nollywood 179
    • Production of video-films  180 
    • Spectatorship  182
    • Ethnicity and languages  185
    • Postcolony and the spectral  186
    • Commodity and religious imaginary  187
    • Narrative form and aesthetics  190
  • In focus 6.1: Living in Bondage (Chris Obi Rapu, 1992/1993)  192
  • The New Nollywood 194
  • In focus 6.2: New Nollywood auteurs: Tunde Kelani, Kunle Afolayan, and Obi Emelonye  195
  • Nollywood’s sphere of influence  201
    • Nollywood, Africa, and African cinema  201 
    • Nollywood and video-film industries within Africa  203
    • Nollywood in the global diaspora  204
    • The influence of Nollywood’s production style  205
  • Nollywood and world cinema  206
    • The popular and pleasure in world cinema and Nollywood  209
  • In focus 6.3: Bamako (2006): a mise-en-scène of Nollywood, African cinema, and world cinema  210
  • African theoretical perspectives  215

 

Chapter 7: Asian Cinema  225

  • Asia, regionalization, and Asian cinema  225
    • The emergence of Asian cinema as a film market  227
    • Asian cinema and film festivals  230
    • Asian cinema as a scholarly discourse  232
    • Asian cinema, geography, and critical regionals  234
  • Inter-Asian cultural sphere  236
    • Korea’s Hallyu  236
    • Kawaii culture: Japan’s (re-)entry into Asia regionalization  238
  • Categories of inter-Asian cinemas  239 
    • Co-production  239 
    • Pan-Asian cinema  242 
  • In focus 7.1: Pan-Asianism in Chen Kaige’s Wu ji: The Promise (2005) and Peter Chan’s Ru guo • Ali/Perhaps Love (2005)   243
    • Regional blockbusters  246
  • The localism of inter-Asian cinema  255
    • Localism in Korean independent cinema  256
    • Localism in Hong Kong  256
  • In focus 7.2: Between Fifth and Sixth Generation: Zhang Yimou and mediated realism in Not One Less (1999)  263
  • In focus 7.3: Localism of the Sixth Generation: Beijing Bastards, Beijing Bicycle, and Suzhou River  269
  • In focus 7.4: Interrogative localism in Jia Zhangke’s Still Life (2006)  275
  • Trans-Asian 282 
    • Popular cinema, blockbusters, and Hollywood  283
    • Trans-Asian art cinema: the adventures of film form  288
  • In focus 7.5: Trans-Asian art cinema: Hong Sang-soo and Hou Hsiao-hsien  289
  • In focus 7.6: What time is it in world cinema? Tsai Ming-Ling and What Time Is it There? (2001)  296
  • Asian theoretical perspective  301 

 

Chapter 8: National formations  313

  • National cinema  313
  • In focus 8.1: New Turkish cinema  318
  • In focus 8.2: New Argentine cinema  322
  • Small and peripheral cinemas  329
  • In focus 8.3: The politics of visibility in Palestinian cinema  333
  • In focus 8.4: Slovenian cinema as small cinema  340

 

Chapter 9: Transnational formations  353

  • Transnational cinema  353
  • In focus 9.1: The transnational cinema of Ang Lee  358
  • In focus 9.2: The transnational cinema of Alejandro González Iñárritu  364
  • Diasporic and postcolonial cinema  372
  • In focus 9.3: Chinese diasporic cinema  377
  • In focus 9.4: Indian diasporic cinema  380
  • In focus 9.5: European migratory cinema: undoing diasporas  386
  • Transnational women’s cinema  392
  • In focus 9.6: Women’s anthology films: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (2011)  397
  • In focus 9.7: Transnational Balkan women directors: Aida Begić’s Djeca/Children of Sarajevo (2012)  402

 

Chapter 10: Polyvalent world cinema  417

  • Cognitive mapping 421
  • Worldliness 424
  • Worlding/world-making 426

Index  432

 

 

 

 

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